General

School of Wok: Three Fast, Furious and Fresh Recipes from Jeremy Pang’s New Cookook

School of Wok: Three Fast, Furious and Fresh Recipes from Jeremy Pang's New Cookook

lIf you’re looking for a quick and easy midweek dinner, Jeremy Pang has it for you with this flavorful shrimp recipe.

Salt and Sichuan Pepper Shrimp

Serves: 2

ingredients

300 g raw tiger prawns without shell

2 tablespoons cornflour

Vegetable oil

6-8 garlic cloves, finely chopped

½ thumb-sized piece of ginger, peeled and finely chopped

1 large red pepper, finely chopped

1-2 spring onions, finely chopped

For the spice mix

1 tbsp Sichuan peppercorns

1 tsp salt

½ tsp white pepper

pinch of sugar

Method

1. Butterfly the shrimp by cutting the shells along the backs and running your knife through the flesh to open them. Stop cutting just before the tail to keep it intact. Scrape out the black digestive cord, place the butterfly shrimp in a mixing bowl and wash well in cold water. Cut horizontally across the shrimp meat four to five times so that they open up nicely during cooking, then dust with the cornstarch.

2. For the spice mix, toast the Sichuan peppercorns in a dry pan and swirl them over medium heat for one to two minutes until they pop and start to smell. Add the salt to the pan, transfer to a mortar or spice grinder, add the white pepper and sugar and grind or grind to a powder.

3. Heat two to three tablespoons of oil in a frying pan and bring to a high heat. Place the shrimp meat side down in the pan and cook for three to four minutes, until they begin to turn pink. Turn and cook the prawns until they are pink all over and remove from the pan.

4. Assemble your ‘wok clock’ (ie arrange your prepared ingredients on a plate before cooking, in the order you will need them): At 12 noon, start with the garlic, then the ginger, red pepper and spring onions , the spice mix and finally the fried shrimp.

5. Heat one to two tablespoons of oil in your wok over medium heat. Add the garlic and stir it constantly until it begins to brown and loosen slightly – about 30 seconds. Then add the ginger, chili pepper and spring onion. Add the spice mix and immediately add the cooked shrimp to the wok. Stir the wok five to six times to completely coat the shrimp before serving.

Beijing mandarin pork

The crunchy batter in this recipe is the perfect sponge for that more sweet and sour sauce

(Kris Kirkam/PA)

“Fried meat doesn’t just have to be crispy,” Pang says.

“In this dish, the sparing use of cornstarch creates a crispy edge around each pork cut, while at the same time allowing it to absorb much of the more sweet and sour sauce.”

Serves: 2

ingredients

2 pork chops or shoulder steaks

½ thumb-sized piece of ginger, peeled and roughly chopped

2 cloves garlic, coarsely chopped

1 spring onion, cut into 2 cm cubes

3 star anise

1 small cinnamon stick

Vegetable oil

Handful of coriander leaves, to garnish

For the marinade

½ tsp salt

½ tsp Chinese five spice

¼ tsp sugar

1 tbsp Shaoxing rice wine (or dry sherry)

1 tsp sesame oil

4 tablespoons cornstarch

For the sauce

½ tbsp orange marmalade

100 ml fresh orange juice

1 tbsp rice vinegar

1 tbsp plum sauce (or ketchup)

1 tbsp light soy sauce

1 tsp dark soy sauce

100 ml chicken stock

Method

1. Gently crush the chops or steaks with the back of your knife or cleaver to tenderize the meat, then cut into three to four centimeter pieces and place in a mixing bowl. Massage the marinade ingredients into the pork, making sure to add the cornflour at the end and mix well.

2. Mix the sauce ingredients in a small bowl.

3. Assemble your ‘wok clock’ (ie arrange your prepared ingredients on a plate before cooking, in the order you will need them): At 12 noon, start with the marinated pork, followed by the ginger, garlic and spring onions. onion, star anise and cinnamon stick, and finally the sauce bowl.

4. Deep-fry the pork in vegetable oil in two batches at 180°C for four to five minutes until golden brown. Place the pork on a plate lined with kitchen paper.

5. If you used your wok for frying, carefully pour the oil into a heatproof bowl to cool and quickly wipe your wok with paper towels. Place the wok back on the hob and bring half a tablespoon of vegetable oil over high heat until piping hot.

6. Add the ginger, garlic and spring onion to the wok and stir-fry for 30-60 seconds before adding the star anise and cinnamon stick. Then add the sauce to the wok and bring to the boil. Once it bubbles quickly, add the fried pork pieces to the sauce and cook vigorously for another one to two minutes. Garnish with coriander and serve.

vegan laksa

A laksa is the perfect quick-win vehicle for leftovers

(Kris Kirkam/PA)

“For me, a laksa is the perfect quick-win vehicle to use up any leftover curry as you can easily use it in place of the homemade curry paste,” says Pang.

“While it won’t be a candle to Malaysia’s laksa aunts, it will be an easy, tasty dinner, so feel free to try this recipe.”

When you make the curry paste, you can freeze the leftovers for another day.

Serves: 2

ingredients

4-5 lime leaves

400 ml can of coconut milk

100g fried tofu pieces, halved diagonally

200 g rice vermicelli

Handful of sugar snap peas

1 carrot, finely chopped

100 g bean sprouts, rinsed

Vegetable oil

For the curry paste

8-10 dried red peppers

2 tsp cumin seeds

2 tsp coriander seeds

1 tsp ground turmeric

½ red onion, finely chopped

½ thumb-sized piece of ginger, peeled and finely chopped

3 cloves garlic, finely chopped

2 lemongrass stalks, trimmed, bruised and finely chopped

For the stock

500 ml coconut water

500 ml vegetable stock

1 tbsp palm sugar (or soft brown sugar)

4 tbsp light soy sauce

½ tsp sea salt flakes

to garnish

lime wedges

Handful of coriander

Sliced ​​red pepper

1 tbsp sambal, ready-made or homemade (optional)

Method

In his third cookbook, Pang shares many of the recipes and techniques he teaches at his cooking school

(Hamlyn/PA)

1. When making the curry paste, soak the dried red chillies in hot water for 10 minutes, drain and chop finely. Grind all the ingredients for the curry paste with a mortar and pestle until smooth. Stir the stock ingredients together in a pitcher.

2. Build your ‘wok clock’ (ie arrange your prepared ingredients on a plate before cooking, in the order you will need them): At 12 noon, start with the curry paste or leftover curry, followed by the lime leaves, coconut milk, the stock, tofu, rice vermicelli, sugar snaps, carrot and finally the bean sprouts.

3. Heat two tablespoons of oil in your wok over medium heat. Add three to four tablespoons of curry paste (or five to six tablespoons of leftover curry) and stir-fry for four to five minutes until it turns in color. Now add the lime leaves and a quarter of the coconut milk and bring to the boil. Stir well, scraping off any paste that sticks to the bottom of the wok, then add another quarter of the coconut milk. Bring to a boil again before adding the remaining coconut milk to the wok. Add the stock and bring to the boil again. Then add the tofu pieces, reduce the heat and simmer for 15-20 minutes until the flavor deepens and the stock reduces.

4. To finish the soup, add the vermicelli and cook for three to four minutes before removing the soup with tongs or a slotted spoon and dividing between serving dishes. Add the sugar snap peas and carrot to the soup and cook for two to three minutes. Remove the vegetables from the soup and place them on top of the noodles. Then dip the bean sprouts in the hot soup for 30 seconds. Spoon the tofu into the serving dishes, followed by the freshly cooked bean sprouts on top. Pour the stock over the bowls of noodles and vegetables and sprinkle over the garnishes.

‘Jeremy Pang’s School Of Wok: Delicious Asian food In Minutes’ (published by Hamlyn, £20; photography by Kris Kirkham), out now.